Successful measurement of pH in an extremely small volume solution – Making minimally invasive blood tests available

March 26(Mon), 2018

The research group led by Toshihiko Kiwa, Associate Professor (Graduate School of Interdisciplinary and Engineering in Health System) at the Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology of Okayama University, was successful in measuring the pH of an extremely small amount of solution, 16 nanoliter (approximately 1/100 of the amount of blood that a mosquito draws in one bite; a nano equals to 1/1 billion), using terahertz (1 terahertz = 1 trillion hertz electromagnetic waves) waves. The measurement was successfully done for the first time using a new microscope, “Terahertz Chemical Microscopy,” originally proposed by the group led by Professor Kiwa. The research accomplishment was published as a research article in the science journal “Optics Express” by the Optical Society in the U.S. on March 21, 2018.

This technology can also be applied to analysis in ions, cells and proteins contents in blood as well as pH, and therefore, gives hope to coming up with minimally invasive blood testing in the future.

 

Article Information

DOI:10.1364/OE.26.008232

Authors: TOSHIHIKO KIWA,TATSUKI KAMIYA, TAIGA MORIMOTO, KENJI SAKAI, AND KEIJI TSUKADA

Journal:Optics Express 

Title: pH measurements in 16-nL-volume solutions using terahertz chemical microscopy

Volume:Vol. 26, Issue 7, pp. 8232-8238

Year of Publication:2018

Okayama University Silicon Valley Office (OUSVO)

Contact: Mototaka Senda, Ph.D.

Phone:    (1)510-894-3067

E-mail:    ousvo@okayama-u.ac.jp

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